Check 4 Major Vital Signs

You should know about four major vital signs concerning your health, including body temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate and respiration rate.

By identifying these signs, you can find out your body’s functionality and detect any abnormalities.

They are often discovered by healthcare providers or medical professionals such as physicians or nurses in order to establish different physiological statistics and determine the level at which a person’s body is performing. Just relying on these parameters, necessary medications or treatments are supported by the patient. Typically, common ranges of measurements of these signals can show the person’s age and medical state.

Learn about different signs by age

Most of us understand that the important signs remain nearly constant during our adult life. But, as infants and kids grow and age, you will find out that the range of these signals changes.

# About temperature

The standard body temperature of a person is a measure of the core body heat that changes according to the gender, recent activity, weight, fluid consumption, time of the day and food. It’s recorded to diagnose a fever (a febrile condition or pyrexia) or to check the hypothermia’s degree (lower body temperature). The parameter might be recorded in different ways such as:

  • Rectally – A digital or glass thermometer will be inserted into the rectum. This technique is usually used in infants because it gives a highly accurate recording of the temperature.
  • Through the ear – With this method, a special thermometer will be used to measure the temperature of the eardrum that reveals the main body's temperature.
  • Orally – Keep the classic glass or modern digital thermometer in the mouth under the tongue to get the temperature. Don’t use this way for children and infants because they can bite or break the thermometer accidentally.
  • Axillary – Put the digital or glass thermometer under the armpit and measure the temperature. This measurement has a tendency to be 0.3 to 0.4oF lower than these measured rectally or orally. That’s why this technique might give the least accurate results.

# About blood pressure

It’s known as the force with which the blood pushes against the artery walls whenever the heart beats. Of course, we need to use an electronic pressure measuring device to measure the blood pressure. And a classic monitoring instrument includes a pressure cuff and the stethoscope that will be operated by the physicians or nurses to examine the patient’s blood pressure.

When measuring, there are two pressures recorded, diastolic and systolic pressure.

The diastolic pressure is the pressure inside the artery that is available between the two associated heartbeats. Meanwhile, the systolic pressure indicates the pressure inside the artery where the heart pumps and contracts into the body. Both are measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg)

# About pulse rate

Pulse rate is the number of times that a heart beats each minute. It often fluctuates or changes with illness, emotions, exercise and injury. The heart will pump blood through the arteries that contract and expand with the blood flow. Therefore, you can measure the pulse rate on any surface of arteries that pass over a bone. Nonetheless, nurses often measure the pulse rate is the radial artery in the wrist. Place the index, middle and ring fingers over this artery (remember to place them above the wrist and on the front surface of the thumb side of the arm). Apply pressure and jot down the rate, strength, tension and rhythm of the pulse.

# About respiratory rate

It is the measure of a person’s breaths which is counted as the number of times a person breathes in a minute. But the rate changes with disease, fever or any other health-concerned conditions.

Age Group Temperature (in 0 Fahrenheit) Pulse Rate Pulse Rate Respiratory Rate
  Diastolic Systolic Average Normal Average Normal Average
Newborn 97.7° F – 99.5° F 30 – 60 65 – 95 80 – 60 100 – 170 140 30 – 50 40
Infants (1 year or less) 97.0° F – 99.0° F 42 – 80 65 – 115 90 – 61 80 – 170 120 20 – 40 30
Toddlers (1 – 3 years) 97.5° F – 98.6° F 46 – 84 76 – 122 99 – 65 80 – 130 110 20 – 30 25
Pre-school children (3 – 6 years) 97.5° F – 98.6° F 48 – 64 85 – 115 100 – 56 75 – 120 100 16 – 22 19
School aged children 97.5° F – 98.6° F 46 – 68 93 – 125 109 – 58 70 – 110 90 14 – 20 17
Adolescent (12 – 17 years) 97.5° F – 98.6° F 51 – 71 99 – 137 118 – 61 60 – 90 75 12 – 20 16
Adults (above 18 years) 97.6° F – 99° F 60 – 90 100 – 140 120 – 80 60 – 110 80 12 – 20 18
Elders (above 70 years) 96.8° F – 97.5° F              

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *